Grants Protecting Public Health - The Long Island Community Foundation
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December 1, 2022   |   By the Long Island Community Foundation
Grants Protecting Public Health

 

Adrienne Esposito of Citizens Campaign for the Environment holds Tide Original laundry detergent. The detergent had one of the highest levels of 1,4-dioxane among the products tested. Photo Credit: Joseph D. Sullivan

Effective December 31, 2022, personal care and household cleansing products containing 1,4-dioxane in concentrations greater than two parts per million (ppm) cannot be sold or offered for sale in New York State. In addition, cosmetic products containing 1,4-dioxane in concentrations greater than ten ppm cannot be sold or offered for sale in New York State. This ‘first-of-its-kind’ law in the nation will protect public health from exposure to the likely carcinogen and prevent further contamination of our water supply.

NYS will ban the sale of products containing certain amounts of 1,4 dioxane beginning on December 31, 2022.  We are proud to say this is a direct result of grants the Long Island Community Foundation made to Citizens Campaign for the Environment to have an independent laboratory test for common household and personal care items.

Identifying common household products that contain 1,4-dioxane was the first step toward empowering the public to safeguard their health and that of our region’s sole source aquifer. So in 2019, with a $22,000 grant from the Long Island Community Foundation, 30 common consumer products were sent to a lab near Rochester and tested. Adrienne Esposito, executive director of Citizens Campaign for the Environment said it was the first independent testing of products for 1,4-dioxane in over 10 years.

The products that tested positive: Neutrogena Rainbath Shower and Bath Gel (Ocean Mist), Suave Essentials Body Wash (Wild Cherry Blossom), Bath and Body Works Shower Gel (Sonoma Weekend Escape), Purex plus Oxy Stain Removers (Fresh Morning Burst), OGX Lavender Platinum, John Frieda Brilliant Brunette, Dove Nutritive Solutions (Coconut and Hydration), Tresemme Moisture Rich with Vitamin E, Suave Professionals Moroccan Infusion (Color Care), Garnier Fructis with Active Fruit Protein, Johnson’s Baby Shampoo, Disney Frozen Bubble Bath, Original Bubble Mr. Bubble. The seven products that had no detection of 1,4-dioxane were Mrs. Meyer (Lavender Scent), Seventh Generation (Free and Clear), Ultra Downey April Fresh (Fabric Softener), Aveeno Baby Gentle Wash and Shampoo, The Honest Company Shampoo & Body Wash, Method Body Wash (with Avocado Extract) and Aveeno Active Minerals Pure Renewal.

1,4-dioxane is not an ingredient, but rather a chemical byproduct of a process used to reduce the risk of skin irritation caused by petroleum-based ingredients, and as such, manufacturers do not have to list it on product labels. The risk of 1,4-dioxane goes far beyond the initial skin contact and inhalation of fumes when using products containing this contaminant as it has been detected throughout Long Islands’ sole source aquifer. Alarmingly, the state and the federal government have not yet set a safe standard for drinking water.

 

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Media Contact Information

Need help or advice?

Marie C. Smith
Director of Donor Relations and Communications
(631) 991-8800, ext. 223
msmith@licf.org

Get our media kit

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